Matt Charlton
Matt is a Product Quality Specialist at NoRedInk (www.noredink.com), an edtech company dedicated to improving students' writing skills. Whilst at work he spends his days thoroughly testing the NoRedInk site in any way possible, ensuring that it remains at the high quality its users expect! He works from his home in Carlisle with colleagues spread across the globe and enjoys the challenges and experiences that this remote working offers.

He's written a few blogs about his experiences and how the NoRedInk QA team works on the NoRedInk blog - https://blog.noredink.com/ Outside of work you'll usually find him either swimming, biking, or running–and a few times a year, putting all three together in a triathlon.


Speech title: Introductions don’t have to be scary

Selecting and introducing a new tool into any process can cause anyone to panic - How do we know we’re picking the correct tool? Are we going to be able to learn to use it? Will it play nicely with everything we already have? The questions will go on and on…

The story I’ll be telling starts with us as a team brand new to automation, tasked with selecting and introducing an end-to-end testing tool, throughout the talk you will see how we approached those questions, challenges and more. I’ll discuss how we designed and followed a process to evaluate the many(!) options out there, the criteria we used to rate them against each other, and everything else we considered before coming to our final decision. Aiming to stay as tool-agnostic as possible, I’ll cover what worked, what didn’t work, and the many lessons we’ve learnt along the way. Finally I’ll look at what changes we’d make next time we find ourselves in this position! Attendees should leave with

• Techniques for selecting new tools

• Knowledge of key criteria to consider when selecting new tools

• An understanding that the community and documentation around a tool can be almost as important as the tool itself

• The acknowledgement that there may not be one right answer to everything

• Real life examples of things that went well / didn’t go well during our process

 
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